Ouch!!!

cow

We’re in the middle of Fall calving here on the farm.  That means that our Fall cow/calf herd of 34 cows and 4 first-time Moms, or otherwise known as replacement heifers, have to be checked on a daily basis.  So, every morning my husband and I travel to each of our two pastures to do just that.  This morning, we noticed a cow off by herself.  This usually means she has had a new baby calf.  That wasn’t the case today.  We discovered that one of her back hooves had been severly cut, and was very swollen.  So, after we had checked the cows in our other pasture, we headed back to load her up and bring her home.

We got her into our working catch pen, and washed her hoof off with antiseptic, and then proceeded to treat her with antibiotic.  This will help the wound to fight off infection, and heal.  We let her out into the lot with the replacement heifers at our homeplace, so that we can keep an eye on her.

We take animal welfare very seriously on our farm.  We never want to see an animal suffer.  You’ve probably heard the expression, ” the animals on our farm come first”.  It’s true; if an animal is in distress, they get priority over anything else on our farm.  Thanks for stopping by today to see what’s been going on here around the farm!

Karra

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Christmas is Almost Here

Well, a few days away it will be Christmas.  The kids are home for Christmas break, and it’s a good thing!  We’ve already needed their help this morning.  Some of our cows got out this morning, so my 9 and 13 year old took off to put them back in and fix the fence.  They got all of them back in and fixed the fence all by themselves!  I headed to town to get a battery and fence charger so that we can keep them in.  After my husband finishes with the morning feeding chores, we’ll get the charger installed, and hopefully that will do the trick.  Those of us that raise livestock must take care of them, and the health and safety of them is our top priority.  Our operation consists of 300 head of cattle that must be cared for on a daily basis.  I followed my  husband around this morning so that you can see how this process works.  He starts off by filling his vertical mixer with silage (ground feed sorghum), alfalfa, and brome hay.

Brome bale just loaded into mixer

Brome bale just loaded into mixer

Then, he lets everything mix up.

Vertical mixer mixing alfalfa, brome hay and silage

Vertical mixer mixing alfalfa, brome hay and silage

Then it’s time to feed the cattle.ee30ecbc-9813-423b-95bd-82329de5075d

Cattle enjoying their breakfast

Cattle enjoying their breakfast

This doesn’t seem like a very time consuming process, but it actually takes about 5 hours of a day.  That being said, when there are special days such as Christmas, our day is a little different.  When I travel to see my family my husband does not get to come along.  So, the kids and I will pack up on Christmas day, and head to the airport after we’ve opened presents.  Wishing all of a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Kansas Agriculture Leads Us

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It’s Kansas Ag Week, so I thought I’d share a few Kansas Ag Facts with you:

– Agriculture is the number one industry in Kansas

– Kansas ranks #7 in total cash receipts from agriculture

– Kansas ranks in the top 15 producing states for Beef, Wheat, Corn, Soybeans, Hay, and Hogs

– Kansas is #1 in grain sorghum production

Sources: Economic Research Services (2009), U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (2010 Statistical Yearbook), Kansas Agricultural Statistics