Out To Pasture

It’s that time of year again when we begin to haul our cattle to the pasture.  This process begins by sorting our cattle, and vaccinating them so that they remain healthy, and putting fly tags in their ears.  They’ll be in the pasture for about 5 months.  We then begin sorting the pairs of cows and calves, making sure we keep our mommas with their babies.  Here’s a pictures of what we use.

Our sorting corral.

Our sorting corral

After we’ve gotten about 5 pair, we put them on our stock trailer and off we go to the pasture!

Our stock trailer.

Our stock trailer

Once they are in the pasture, we then check on them periodically to make sure they are all there, and give them mineral, and range cubes.  These provide them with the nutrition they need when not being fed silage/hay/ground milo.  We take them to the pasture because we don’t have enough hay/silage/milo to feed them all year round, and once it’s warm, the grass growing in our pastures provides them with something to eat.  Each pasture also has a pond for them to drink water from.  We have about 1,000 acres of pasture we own/rent.  This allows us to divide up our 150 cows and calves so that they have plenty of space.  It also gives us a break in the spring/summer so that we can devote our time to putting up more hay/alfalfa for them, planting silage, soybeans, milo and harvesting our wheat crop.

Cattle in one of our pastures

Cattle in one of our pastures

They look pretty happy don’t they!!!  I think I could handle being a cow too!!!  Well, my husband will soon be calling for me to bring the stock trailer so that we can haul more cows/calves to pasture, so until next time, happy trails!

Caring For Our Animals

Do animals raised for meat live in inhumane conditions?
Healthy, content animals are simply good business for farmers and the well-being of their animals is a very high priority. Farmers and ranchers are constantly exploring new ways to raise their animals in the best way. Many participate in stewardship and certification programs that ensure the good care of their animals, according to the Animal Agriculture Alliance.
All production systems have advantages and disadvantages, but all have been designed with the health and well-being of animals and humans in mind. Housing protects animals from predators, disease and bad weather. Housing also makes reproduction and birth less stressful, protects young animals and makes it easier to care for healthy and sick animals. Modern animal housing is well ventilated, warm, well lit, clean and scientifically designed to meet specific needs for temperature, light, water and food, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association. On a well-run farm or ranch, the animals’ well-being is a part of all considerations. Shana Beattie, a farmer from Nebraska talks about how they take care of the pigs on their farm during the winter to keep them comfortable.

We also take pride in caring for our animals.  Each day my husband spends two hours feeding our herd of beef cattle.  We feed them a mixture of ground hay, silage, ground milo, and vitamins to provide them a balanced diet.  We make sure they have plenty of room to move around, and water to drink.  We also give them preventative vaccines in the Spring and Fall, to make sure they stay healthy.  If we have a sick animal, we get them treated right away with antibiotic, and make sure that animal does not leave our farm before the antibiotic has left their system.  We also take our cattle to the veterinarian, if there is a problem we can’t address on the farm.  We enjoy taking care of our animals, and make it a priority!!!

Wheat Worry

Matthew 6:34

This morning my husband seemed to be a little weary-eyed. I asked what was wrong. He responded, “I was up all night checking on the temperature”. We’ve had some abnormal temperatures in our area over the last few days, with temperatures dipping down into the low 20’s at night. When your a wheat farmer, this is not good. Our wheat has entered the jointed stage, shown below.

 

Picture showing wheat in the jointing stage.

Picture showing wheat in the jointing stage.

 

Any temperature below 24 degrees could cause the wheat to freeze, and thus die. We’re hoping that has not happened, but we won’t know for sure, just yet. Here’s a picture I took this morning in one of our fields.

Picture of wheat in our fields.

Picture of wheat in our fields.

We’ll check again in a few days. If if looks wilted, we’ll know it has been frozen. So the only thing we can do is trust in the Lord, for only he knows what will happen. So if you’re overwhelmed with the pressures of daily life, take time to pray, and let God handle your worries for you. Until next time, Blessings!

Karra

Heavy Heart

God says, ” I have loved you with a love that will last forever.  That is why I have continued showing you kindness.”  Jeremiah 31:3. 

This morning as I was going about the house doing my morning chores, I was pondering the words I heard yesterday during our church service.  ” Who doesn’t want to know they’re loved by God?”  This phrase is so true.  After seeing the tragic events unfold today in Boston, it makes my heart ache even more for those who have not yet experienced God’s love.  I know that I don’t always do the best job of sharing my faith with others, but I feel we, as Christians, must reach out.  Our country and world are counting on us.  So what do you say?  Let’s all try and do a better job of sharing God’s love!